The effects of Hurricane Beryl making landfall in Texas are being felt in an area once featured on a popular HGTV TV show.

HGTV Show Homes In Hurricane's Path

Millions were left without power after Hurricane Beryl slammed parts of Texas on Monday. Photos from the area show heavy flooding along the coastline, including Surfside, Texas.

The small coastal town with a population of around 640 people might sound familiar to HGTV viewers. Three homes in the town were featured in season 2 of Battle on the Beach.

During the season, three teams put their renovation skills to the test in an attempt to win $50,000 Judges for the contest included HGTV personalities Ty Pennington, Alison Victoria and Taniya Nayak.

Carter Signature Properties via Realtor.com
Carter Signature Properties via Realtor.com
loading...

The trio of homes sit next to each other along the Gulf of Mexico. They have been on and off the market multiple times since the show aired. Most recently, all three were listed for sale as a package deal for $2.4 million.

The current status of the homes is unknown. The real estate listing for all three was still available online as of Tuesday afternoon.

Path Of Hurricane Beryl Continues

The effects of Hurricane Beryl continue to be felt in other parts of the U.S. Weather.com says it should now be considered a "post-tropical low-pressure system" as it makes its way north.

Getty Images
Getty Images
loading...

That now means areas such as the Midwest and Northeast are in for heavy rains in the coming days.

READ MORE: Relaxing Fishing Trip Turns Into Daring Rescue Of Nearly 40 Dogs In Lake

Arkansas and as far north as Illinois were getting hit with heavy rain on Tuesday. Weather.com is predicting the storm will move further into the Great Lakes and into the Northeast on Wednesday.

As of Tuesday, the Houston Chronicle had confirmed seven deaths attributed to Hurricane Beryl.

Hurricane Beryl Makes Landfall In Texas

Gallery Credit: Rob Carroll

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.

Gallery Credit: KATELYN LEBOFF

More From 97.7 KCRR